Mind Games 2.0

Bloggin' 'bout science and life

Tag: Theodore Roosevelt

Morality and Idealism Do Matter

The opening paragraph of Theodore Roosevelt’s book American Ideals: And Other Essays, Social and Political states the following:

In his noteworthy book on National Life and Character, Mr. Pearson says: ” The countrymen of Chatham and Wellington, of Washington and Lincoln, in short the citizens of every historic state, are richer by great deeds that have formed the national character, by winged words that have passed into current speech, by the examples of lives and labors consecrated to the service of the commonwealth.” In other words, every great nation owes to the men whose lives have formed part of its greatness not merely the material effect of what they did, not merely the laws they placed upon the statute books or the victories they won over armed foes, but also the immense but indefinable moral influence produced by their deeds and words themselves upon the national character. It would be difficult to exaggerate the material effects of the careers of Washington and of Lincoln upon the United States. Without Washington we should probably never have won our independence of the British crown, and we should almost certainly have failed to become a great nation, remaining instead a cluster of jangling little communities, drifting toward the type of government prevalent in Spanish America. Without Lincoln we might perhaps have failed to keep the political unity we had won; and even if, as is possible, we had kept it, both the struggle by which it was kept and the results of this struggle would have been so different that the effect upon our national history could not have failed to be profound. Yet the nation’s debt to these men is not confined to what it owes them for its material well-being, incalculable though this debt is. Beyond the fact that we are an independent and united people, with half a continent as our heritage, lies the fact that every American is richer by the heritage of the noble deeds and noble words of Washington and of Lincoln. Each of us who reads the Gettysburg speech or the second inaugural address of the greatest American of the nineteenth century, or who studies the long campaigns and lofty statesmanship of that other American who was even greater, cannot but feel within him that lift toward things higher and nobler which can never be bestowed by the enjoyment of mere material prosperity.

This is a fantastic statement about why character, moral example, and the art of language does matter in our political leaders.

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RINOs

I’m a proud RINO. I’ve been called that a lot, and I like it and am proud to be called so. After the founders, my political heroes are people like Henry Clay, Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt and Dwight Eisenhower. These political leaders understood the necessity of government providing the playing field for the nation’s economy: not to run the economy, but to provide the infrastructure and rulebook to have the private economy flourish.

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